Program 205

Program 205 – Historical Introduction

The Announcement. Arikara.

The Announcement. Arikara. Photo by Edward S. Curtis. Courtesy of a2zcds. www.a2zcds.com

The Mandan and Hidatsa

with Arlie Neskahi

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From the journal of William Clark::
William Clark, January 1 st, 1805, Fort Mandan. The day was ushered in by the discharge of two cannon. We suffered 16 men with their music to visit the first village for the purpose of dancing.

Arlie Neskahi:
Welcome to Wisdom of the Elders. I’m Arlie Neskahi.

Winter on the Northern Plains comes early and stays long. The people of the villages usually go to winter camps built of temporary earth lodges in sheltered areas away from the open river. But this year, the people wanted to stay together in the larger summer quarters.

Program 205 – Elder Wisdom

Edwin Benson

Edwin Benson

Edwin Benson

with Brian Bull

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Arlie Neskahi:
Loss is inevitable – whether it’s a childhood home, a favorite relative, even a traditional name.

Mandan-Hidatsa elder Edwin Benson says memories can restore people, places, and even a person’s cultural identity. On today’s Elder Wisdom, Brian Bull has more:

Program 205 – Sacred Landscape

Judy Bluehorse Skelton

Judy Bluehorse Skelton

Gardening among the Mandan and Hidatsa

with Judy Bluehorse Skelton

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Arlie Neskahi:
Many tribes, including the Mandan and Hidatsa, grew beans, corn, squash and other vegetables to supplement their diet and to trade for other goods. These bountiful gardens, planted and maintained by the women, served as a favorite place to gather and socialize. Judy Bluehorse Skelton, a passionate gardener herself, talks about the gardening traditions among the Mandan and Hidatsa.

Program 205 – Tribal Rhythms

 

Nico Wind

Nico Wind

Hidatsa Songkeeper Alexander Gwin

with Nico Wind

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Arlie Neskahi:
To many listeners, traditional native music often means one of two things- either Pow Wow drums, or ancient chants. In reality, native music is both of these and so much more. Among the Mandan and Hidatsa, music infuses everyday life, gives it meaning, spirit and grace. So the keeper of songs is not just an entertainer, but holds an essential place in society. On today’s Tribal Rhythms, Nico Wind takes us to Mandaree, North Dakota to meet with song keeper, Alexander Gwin.

Program 205 – Contemporary Rhythms

Keith Bear

Copyright H. Taylor Haynes. Courtesy of Makoche Music.

Keith Bear

with Milt Lee

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Arlie Neskahi :
Among many tribes, the earth is female in respect to the sky and wind, which are male. In this way, the Native wooden flutes are related to the wind and the birds who travel through sky man’s world.

In many northern tribes, the flute was used in courting, to win the heart of a loved one. Today, on Contemporary Rhythms, Milt Lee talks with Keith Bear, a Mandan Hidatsa flute player from New Town, North Dakota.

Program 205 – Turtle Island Storytellers

Victor Mandan

Victor Mandan. Photo by Milt Lee.

Victor Mandan: How Cherry Necklace got his Snake Medicine

with Victor Mandan

Music: Final Journey John Huling Spiritlands Red Feather www.fourwinds-trading.com Victor Mandan: There was a time when a man who wanted power would go out and perhaps stand on a hill. Or perhaps he would seek a revered animal to take it and make it his medicine. And that is why we have people who carry eagle bundles and hawk bundles and things of this nature. And all animals and all beings were considered sacred by the ancient ones. They had no concept of evil, inherent badness in anything.