Program 302

Program 302 – Artist’s Circle

Corwin Clairmont

Corwin Clairmont. Photo by Larry Johnson.

Artist’s Circle: Corwin Clairmont

with Bruce Crespin

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Arlie Neskahi:
The hearts and minds of native people and their ancestors are expressed in their art, be it beaded buckskin, cedar baskets or ceramic bowls. Contemporary tribal artists can draw from a greater variety of media than their ancestral peers. They may paint on canvas or work with photographs, metals, or natural materials, often connecting with tribal realities in subtle or ironic ways. In today’s Artist’s Circle, Bruce Crespin explores the work of Salish-Kootenai conceptual artist “Corky” Clairmont.

Program 302 – Turtle Island Storytellers

Vernon Finley

Vernon Finley. Photo by Larry Johnson.

Vernon Finley

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Vernon Finley:
From a western perspective you hear all of these stories, and you say, “Oh, Coyote’s the one character who’s in all of them, so ah, so he must be the hero,” or, “So he must be the one in the,” you know, “the main character.” So we’ll call them Coyote stories.” But the reason why Coyote is in the stories in Kootenai culture is because he’s the example of how not to be. He does a lot of things wrong, culturally, in the story. The biggest mistake that Coyote always makes is trying to have medicine. He always tries to imitate somebody else’s medicine, and then as a result, screws it up.