Series Three

Program 306: The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indians

Audio and Transcripts

Indians netting fish at Celilo Falls on the Columbia River (Oregon State Archives OHD G211).  Courtesy Oregon Blue Book

Indians netting fish at Celilo Falls on the Columbia River (Oregon State Archives OHD G211). Courtesy Oregon Blue Book

Historical Introduction:
Arlie Neskahi discusses the history of this Columbia River tribe and how tribes from the region and beyond all converged on the villages of the Wishram and the Wasco to trade, socialize and do ceremony.

Elder Wisdom:
Brian Bull shares the story of Adeline Miller who was “born up in the mountains during huckleberry time.”  Now a tribal elder, she reminds her children and grandchildren of their origins through song, dance, and laughter.

Speaking Native:
Don Addison tell us that three native languages survive on this reservation today: Northern Paiute (also called Numu), Sahaptin (or Eecheeshkeen), and Wasco, known as Kiksht.

Program 308: The Chinook Tribe

Audio and Transcripts

Chinook Canoe, courtesy National Geographic

Chinook Canoe, courtesy National Geographic

Historical Introduction: Arlie Neskahi tells of the Chinook tribe’s 1805-1806 encounter with the Lewis and Clark Expedition and discusses the history of their people since the Expedition as the tribe strives to achieve recognition from the federal government.

Elder Wisdom: Brian Bull shares the stories and heritage of Chinook elders, Millie and George Lagergren, who continue to practice the Chinook traditions, basketweaving, canoe building, paddle-making… and telling stories of the early years.

Speaking Native: Don Addison teaches us that the term “Chinook language” and “Chinook Wa-Wa, known as Chinook jargon, refers to several different trade languages.