Series One

Program 107: Tribute to Native Artists

Audio and Transcripts

Moonlight Stick Indian Raku. Lillian Pitt.

Moonlight Stick Indian Raku. Lillian Pitt.

Elder Wisdom:
Barbara Roberts features world-renowned Wasco mask maker and artist, Lillian Pitt. She shares how her art reflects her cultural heritage as a Wasco, offers additional background on the inspiration behind some of her masks, especially from the famous Columbia River petroglyph, “She Who Watches.”

Health and Healing:
Judy Bluehorse Skelton shares that the healing arts take many forms and can be found in abundance throughout the natural world. Today she reveal the art of making and using essential oils and shares how the beauty and aroma of flowers and trees offer healing of our physical as well as our emotional, mental and spiritual health.

Tribal Rhythms:
This feature spotlights several contemporary musicians, describing and playing their music as a diverse expression of art. Nico Wind introduces us to several contemporary native artists who are pushing the boundaries of music with infusions of jazz, blues, country, rap and classical expression.

Program 108: Native Relationships

Audio and Transcripts

Vi Hilbert. Photo by Jim Lott, the Seattle Times

Vi Hilbert. Photo by Jim Lott, the Seattle Times

Elder Wisdom: Nationally prominent storyteller, Vi Hilbert tells of the bonds of friendship between Samish people from the San Juan Islands with their neighbors. She shares stories in both English and her traditional language regarding relationships within their villages. She also speaks of the relationship her people shared with the rivers, their natural transportation highways, and of the cedar trees which were artfully carved into their river canoes.

Health and Healing: Judy Bluehorse Skelton speaks of the relationships between the young and their grandparents, and how the young people hold a sacred place in the Indian community. She shares how traditionally, the elders would help the new ones come into this world to see what their gifts would be to their family and their community.

Tribal Rhythms: Nico Wind talks about the Forty Niner songs. These are social dances, usually taking place after the powwow is over, sometimes until the rays of the morning sun are just peeking over the horizon. Their central themes are usually romance, heartbreak and promised love.