Program 306

Program 306 – Historical Introduction

Indians netting fish at Celilo Falls on the Columbia River

Indians netting fish at Celilo Falls on the Columbia River (Oregon State Archives OHD G211).

Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indians

with Arlie Neskahi

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Arlie Neskahi:
Welcome to Wisdom of the Elders. I’m Arlie Neskahi.

It was the sound of it that gave the Great Falls its name. Tm’m.

The sound of water hitting rock. Tm’m. The great Columbia River, draining all of the Northwest, gushed over the basalt barriers, pounding the rock like a giant gong, calling the people from miles around. Tm’m.

Program 306 – Elder Wisdom

Adeline Miller

Adeline Miller. Courtesy First Peoples Fund.

Adeline Miller

with Brian Bull

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Arlie Neskahi:
Many years ago, an elder would always remind Adeline Miller that she was “born up in the mountains, during huckleberry time”. Now a tribal elder herself, Miller reminds her children and grandchildren of their origins – through song, dance, and ceremony. It’s what keeps Miller spry, as Brian Bull explains on today’s Elder Wisdom.

Program 306 – Speaking Native

Don Addison

Don Addison. Photo by Larry Johnson.

Numu, Eecheeshkeen, and Kiksht

with Don Addison

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Arlie Neskahi:
Welcome back to Wisdom of the Elders.

Don Addison:
Halito! I’m Don Addision and this is Speaking Native.

Three Native languages survive on the Warm Springs Reservation today: Northern Paiute (also called Numu), Sahaptin, or Eecheeshkeen, and Wasco, known as Kiksht.

Program 306 – Sacred Landscape

Judy Bluehorse Skelton

Judy Bluehorse Skelton

The Three Sisters of the Northwest

with Judy Bluehorse Skelton

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Arlie Neskahi:
Hidden amidst the volcanoes of the Cascade Mountain Range, favorite berry-picking spots are prized by people in the northwest. For the Confederated Tribes of Warms Springs Indians, huckleberries have been celebrated and picked for thousands of years and are included in the first foods ceremony held every spring along the Columbia River. Today, Judy Bluehorse Skelton, talks about berries and what the tribe is doing to ensure there will be plenty to pick in the future.

Program 306 – Tribal Rhythms

Nico Wind

Nico Wind

Carlos Calica

with Nico Wind

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Arlie Neskahi:
The powwow drum has been described as the heartbeat of mother earth. As a drum travels around the country or the world, it starts to take on a spirit of its own, a voice of its own. When a drum is not in use it is covered and stored carefully and respectfully. Some drums are brought out only on special occasions. So it is with this drum. Traditional singer, Carlos Calica is the keeper of this drum; it’s a drum that belonged to his grandfather, a drum Carlos sang on as a child. In today’s Tribal Rhythms, Nico Wind brings you the music of the Warm Springs in a conversation with Carlos Calica, and the Art Mitchell drum.

Program 306 – Health and Healing

Kahneeta Resort

Kahneeta Resort

Faye Wahneka

with Rose High Bear

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Arlie Neskahi:
Today, on reservations all over America, people are learning to live with Type II diabetes. What we need in Indian Country are role models representing healthy lifestyles. If we look, we’ll find those role models right in front of us – our elders.