Program 301

Program 301 – Historical Introduction

October camp on the Snake River

October camp on the Snake River, ca. 1842, (Fremont: 1887) Courtesy of Trailtribes.org

The Lemhi Shoshone

with Arlie Neskahi

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Arlie Neskahi:
Welcome to Wisdom of the Elders. I’m Arlie Neskahi.

It was mid-August. Summer clouds tore at the peaks of the Beaverhead Mountains. The Lemhi were spread out in the pass below, gathering roots, hunting and fishing. They were preparing for their annual buffalo-hunt on the plains. A lone warrior caused a minor commotion when he returned to camp claiming he had seen four men as pale as ashes walking up the pass. No one believed him. They had never seen a white man.

Program 301 – Elder Wisdom

Emma George

Emma George

Leo Ariwite, Rod Ariwite and Emma George

with Brian Bull

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Arlie Neskahi:
Sacajawea stands out as the most prominent of the Lemhi Shoshone, yet some Shoshone question her role in the expedition. It helped facilitate westward expansion, eventually affecting her tribe’s homeland and traditions. The forced relocation of the Lemhis to Fort Hall, Idaho in the early 1900’s is also a painful chapter for many tribal members, who still long to return to their ancestral homeland in Salmon, Idaho. In today’s Elder Wisdom, Brian Bull explores the determination of the Lemhi people to hold on to their cultural identity.

Program 301 – Speaking Native

Don Addison

Don Addison Photo by Larry Johnson

The Shoshone Language

with Don Addison

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Arlie Neskahi:
Welcome back to Wisdom of the Elders.

Don Addison:
Halito! I’m Don Addision and this is speaking native.

Our featured tribe today speaks Shoshone, part of a very large language family called Uto-Aztecan. It spans a huge portion of the American West from the Oregon basin into Mexico.

Program 301 – Sacred Landscape

Lewis and Clark at Three Fork

Detail from E.S. Paxson's 1912 Painting, "Lewis and Clark at Three Forks." Courtesy of the Montana Historical Society www.virginia.edu/insideuva/2001/07/project.html

Sacagawea’s Legacy

with Judy Bluehorse Skelton

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Arlie Neskahi:
Few women in American history have achieved the mythic status of Sacajawea. Her role in the Lewis and Clark Expedition sparked the imaginations of all who would read of her exploits in the popular journals. While mystery still surrounds accounts of her life after Lewis and Clark returned home, Sacajawea serves as a larger-than-life inspiration to young women everywhere. Judy Bluehorse Skelton shares her perspective on the legend and the woman.

Program 301 – Tribal Rhythms

Circle Dance

Circle Dance, Judith Vander recording http://judithvander.com/Multimedia%20NA.htm

The Ghost Dance

with Nico Wind

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Arlie Neskahi:
More than a century ago, in isolated places in the west, groups of Native men, women and children would gather in secret to sing and dance and pray. A note of fear, pain and suffering would pervade the atmosphere. The people’s lives had been turned upside down. Disease had killed many of them. And the rest expected to be killed by the U.S. Military. They asked the creator to spare them, return the buffalo herds in abundance, and magically resurrect all their dead ancestors.