Program 207

Program 207 – Historical Introduction

Bald Eagle.

Bald Eagle. Photo by Dan Earnhardt. Courtesy of the National Parks Service. www.nps.gov

The Assiniboine and the Gros Ventre

with Arlie Neskahi

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From the journal of William Clark::
Meriwether Lewis, April 25 th. The whole face of the country was covered with herds of buffalo, elk, and antelopes. They are so gentle that we pass near them while feeding, without appearing to excite any alarm among them. They frequently approach us more nearly to discover what we are.

Neskahi:
Welcome to Wisdom of the Elders. I’m Arlie Neskahi. On April 14th, 1805, the expedition passed a small creek. The creek already had a name, but Lewis and Clark gave it a new one. They named it after their interpreter, Touissaint Charbonneau, the French adventurer who had previously camped there. Lewis believed it to be the farthest any white man had ventured up the Missouri. Perhaps this was a momentous occasion for the explorers, but in the vast Northern Plains, crossed for thousands of years by the original tribes, the achievement loses some of its significance.

Program 207 – Elder Wisdom

Peter Bigstone

Peter Bigstone

Peter Bigstone

with Brian Bull

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Arlie Neskahi:
Assiniboine elder Peter Bigstone has a big heart. It’s swollen with a lasting love for his wife, his late grandfather, and his culture. In today’s Elder Wisdom, Brian Bull tells how Bigstone speaks – even sings – his devotion to family and tribal traditions.

Program 207 – Sacred Landscape

Judy Bluehorse Skelton

Judy Bluehorse Skelton

The Buffalo

with Judy Bluehorse Skelton

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Arlie Neskahi:
The buffalo and Native people have experienced much change since Lewis and Clark first encountered them in 1804. Long immortalized in books, artwork and films, the horse and buffalo culture of the Plains tribes still capture the imagination of people today. For many years, the U.S. nickel memorialized both the Indian and the buffalo. Visitors to Yellowstone Park continue to feel a sense of awe when they catch their first glimpse of buffalo grazing in the meadow.

On today’s Sacred Landscapes, Judy Bluehorse Skelton talks about the changing landscapes that are bringing Native people and the buffalo back to the Great Plains.

Program 207 – Tribal Rhythms

Nico Wind

Nico Wind

Assiniboine Singer Roger White, Jr.

with Nico Wind

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Arlie Neskahi:
In Wolf Point, Montana, one young Assiniboine singer has been working to bring back tribal music traditions and learn old songs that haven’t been sung on his reservation for decades. On today’s Tribal Rhythms, Nico Wind takes us to the bottom edge of Assiniboine country on the Ft. Peck Indian Reservation to talk to singer, Roger White, Jr.

Program 207 – Contemporary Rhythms

Dorrance Comes Last

Dorrance Comes Last Photo by Milt Lee

Native Siouxperman

with Milt Lee

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Arlie Neskahi :
The population of a reservation often reflects the chaotic conditions of the late nineteenth century. Following the great Sioux war of the 1860’s, bands of Nakotah Sioux were given refuge by the Assiniboine. As a result, people of Nakotah ancestry live side by side with the Assinboine on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. In today’s Contemporary Rhythms, Milt Lee takes us to meet one such person, a Nakotah rap artist, Native Sioux-per man.

Program 207 – Turtle Island Storytellers

Golden Eagle. Yellowstone National Park.

Golden Eagle. Yellowstone National Park. Courtesy of the National Parks Service. www.nps.gov

Robert Four Star

with Robert Four Star

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Robert Four Star::
Speaks in Assiniboine language

Music:

Grandmother’s Lamb
Delphine Tsinajinne
Mother’s World
Canyon Records

Arlie Neskahi:
On today’s Turtle Island Storytellers Robert Four Star tells a story from his mother who shortly before her passing sang a song to the eagles.